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Emil Khudyev was appointed as the new instructor of clarinet at the Interlochen Arts Academy in 2014. Prior to this position, he served as the acting Associate Principal, Second and E flat Clarinet of the Kansas City Symphony.

Recently named as the first Vandoren Emerging Artist Competition winner, clarinetist Emil Khudyev is recognized as an outstanding musician on the international concert stage around the world today. Emil’s sincere music-creating promotes the arts and builds the next generation of classical music lovers of all ages.

Emil has won numerous competitions and awards, including the Yale Chamber Music Society Competition, the Tuesday Music Club Competition the Yamaha International Competition, the Cleveland Institute of Music Concerto Competition, the Glenn Miller Competition, and the 2004 Detroit (Bohemian) Concerto Competition. Emil was the first clarinetist to win The Harvard Musical Association Foote Prize Award, and was also a recipient of the Yale School of Music’s Prestigious Thomas Daniel Nyfenger Award for Outstanding Achievement and Leadership in Music.

As a soloist, Emil has appeared with the Champaign-Urbana Symphony Orchestra under Maestro Farkhad Khudyev, where he received an outstanding review. In addition, he has soloed with the New Haven Chamber Orchestra, Saybrook College Orchestra, Cleveland Institute of Music Orchestra, Turkmen Chamber Orchestra, Manitowoc Wind Ensemble, and the Interlochen Arts Academy band.

Emil is a sought after recitalist and chamber musician throughout North America Europe and Central Asia. He has performed as soloist in prestigious halls and venues such as Carnegie Hall, Walt Disney Concert Hall, Colton Hall, Severance Hall, Krannert Center for the Performing Arts, Seiji Ozawa Hall, Paul Hall, Glinka Hall in Russia, Mahtumkuli Hall in Turkmenistan, and Wolsey Hall. Emil is an active chamber musician and a founding member of the Boetti Trio, and has collaborated with artists such as Yo-Yo-Ma, Joseph Siverstein, Emanuel Ax,  members from theTokyo String Quartet, and Linden Quartet. He has appeared on both radio and TV, on NPR, WCLV and the Turkmen Channel 1.

As an orchestral musician, Emil has performed with the world’s top orchestras, including The Cleveland Orchestra, the Opera Naples Orchestra, the Pacific Symphony, the Norwalk Symphony, the New Haven Symphony, the Mansfield Symphony, the Fresno Philharmonic, and a side-by-side with the Berlin Philharmonic. At the Tanglewood Music Festival, Emil was appointed to Principal Clarinet, where he performed under Maestro James Levine, and received the prestigious Gino B. Cioffi Memorial Prize. Other festival appearances include Music Academy of the West, Colorado College Music Festival, International Clarinet Festival, Sarasota Music Festival and Interlochen Arts Camp. Emil has played under the world’s leading conductors including, Herbert Blomstedt, Michael Tilson Thomas, Peter Oundjian, Kurt Masur, John Williams, Krzysztof Penderecki, Rafael Fruhbeck de Burgos, David Robertson, Leonard Slatkin, James Conlon, Gerald Schwarz, Robert Spano, Oliver Knussen, Joe Smirnoff, Farkhad Khudyev, Yehuda Gilad, Larry Rachleff and Michael Stern.

Born in 1986 in Turkmenistan Emil is the youngest of three siblings. Emil followed his older brothers’ steps and began his musical training. At the age of 7, he was admitted to the Special Music School of Turkmenistan, then one of the fifteen republics of the Soviet Union. In the summer of 2001 Emil won a full scholarship to attend the Interlochen Arts Camp, and was immediately offered a full scholarship to attend the Interlochen Arts Academy, where studied for four years with Nathan Williams. In 2005, Emil began further studies at the Cleveland Institute of Music under Franklin Cohen, Yale University to study under David Shifrin, where he received his Master’s Degree and The Colburn School Conservatory of Music under Yehuda Gilad.

Emil is a Vandoren artist, and he often performs with his wife, Nozomi, who is a wonderful pianist. They enjoy every moment spending time with their daughter.

The Colburn Conservatory
Yale University, Yale School of Music
Cleveland Insitute of Music
Interlochen Center for the Arts
Tanglewood Music Center
Vandoren Artists
Music Academy of the West

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The audience expressed its appreciation with rousing applause and a standing ovation.
Clarinetist Emil Khudyev appeared with Marusawa to perform “Oblivion” by Astor Piazolla, and this turned out to be one of the best performances of the evening. Not only did he impress us with the lovely sounds he produced, but he also amazed us with his range of dynamic contrasts ranging all the way from the almost inaudible (but always with a presence) to climactic passages that were both musical and elegant. With Piazolla we expect the ubiquitous tango, but in this piece the tango rhythms are so subtle that we put aside our expectations and just luxuriated in the beautiful lyricism of this piece. It was a great performance, and pianist Marusawa made the orchestra reduction something special. One of the surprises of the evening was clarinetist Emil Khudyev’s performance of the Fantasy on themes from the opera Luisa di Montfort, by Michael Bergson, a Polish composer (born in1820 and died in1898). Here is an opera so obscure that even a wellknown opera buff in last nights audience had never heard of it. However, this arrangement of themes from the opera has become a staple of the clarinet repertoire, and last night we found out why. An early Romantic piece that shows influence of Chopin and Carl Maria von Weber, it had moments of great beauty and hair raising excitement. The windup in the last two minutes with its rapid repeated notes, once heard is something you will never forget. The program ended with a work by Farkhad called “Fleeting Miniatures” performed by violinist Farkhad, clarinetist Emil and pianist Marusawa. During its duration of approximately seven minutes we heard conflicting compositional styles contrasting aggressively shrill dissonance with gentle moments of lyric beauty (often interrupted by ear-splitting dissonances). Never did the piece seem long, and that is a credit to Farkhad’s mastery of his craft. The ending of this piece made a powerful effect with a long, drawn out decrescendo and ghostly sounding harmonics by Farkhad. The audience expressed its appreciation with rousing applause and a standing ovation.
Lyn Bronson, Peninsula Review
Multiple congratulations would seem to be in order!
Emil, who is a brilliant clarinet virtuoso. The brothers Khudyev joined in a delightful performance of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart's Clarinet Concerto in A Major. From Emil's vita it would appear that he is a rising star among clarinet players, and his technical mastery of the virtuoso passages of the Mozart Concerto was very impressive. The gem of this work is the mesmerizing slow movement, and Emil Khudyev spun out the lovely line of Mozart's melody with masterly skill. What was especially delightful in his playing was his habit of swooping down with the melodic line and slowly rising while playing his way up through the clarinet's registers. The brilliant end of the Rondo finale brought Emil Khudyev a standing ovation. Members of the Khudyev family were present at the concert, and we were told that Emil is soon to be married in Chicago. Multiple congratulations would seem to be in order!
The News-Gazette Champaign,IL
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The audience expressed its appreciation with rousing applause and a standing ovation.
Lyn Bronson, Peninsula Review
Multiple congratulations would seem to be in order!
The News-Gazette Champaign,IL